Progressive Whatever Trevors

Let’s have a little fun here. I am tired of talking family ickiness and mental breakdowns.

Yeah, I don’t think I know how to do that either. Oh, all be dog boggled, I think we can go with our feelings. I am going to start with my Favourites on Deezer (don’t worry, I will not list all 152):

“Fields of Fire” – Big Country (Guitars sounding like bagpipes. Yes!)
“Good Fortune” – PJ Harvey (Not to be mixed up with DJ Harvey, though his offerings are rather good.)
“Paris 1919” – John Cale (I have three versions of this song on my Favourites list. Addicted muchly.)
“Dog Days Are Over” – Florence + The Machine (No animals or skid steers were injured in the playing of this song.)
“Waf-Woof” – The Springfields (Dusty Springfield pre-solo years.)
“I’m Wondering” – Skydiggers (Do I need to maintain the 35% CanCon rule?)
“California Dreamline” – Rheostatics (Their name used to proceed with a ‘The’.)
“Loving is Easy” – Rex Orange County (I blame Dave for the addition of this song to my collection.)
“Le moribond” – Jacques Brel (Though I do not understand all the words, I get the sarcasm.)
“The Lines You Amend” – Sloan (A gorgeous song, yet one I cannot share on Facebook.)
“People Give In” – Manic Street Preachers (Tony, you know I could not forget to include the Manics.)
“You Can’t Do Disco Without a Strat” – Andrew Weatherall (Though the presentation seems angry, the song is rather good. Mr Weatherall may have needed a nap.)
“Death of a Rude Boy” – Madness (Somehow the skaness makes me weak. I don’t get it, yet I like it.)
“Faster Than the Speed of Night” – Bonnie Tyler (For some reason I see Stephen Morris, of New Order Fame, going all wild and crazy on the drums on a cover of this song. That will never happen, I understand.)
“Jessie’s Girl” – Rick Springfield (My karaoke song. I am going to demand a redo of this song at the next Cosmo Christmas party, as the song started before I could get into character. The drunk dude before me got a restart. Bah!)

I ask that you check some of these songs out on YouTube. I purposely chose not to include links, as searching for these songs will lead to other amazing places, which could ultimately take you away from the original assignment.

That is a good thing.

Richard is going away on a trek to the mountains and will be stopping in to have lunch with me. I am on assignment, waiting for emails and phone calls. Oh, and blockages on Facebook due to the fact Richard does not want his next family reunion to be at Madge Lake.

Be brave, dear husband; listen to The Beatles and may the Force be with you.

 

Boléro Oh Oh

Well, my classmates, it is coming along nicely. The Boléro, that is.

I do not want to offend my DJ master mixer friends, but this piece is one of the best examples of repetitive beats you will ever find – bar none. The instrumentation, as a whole, is very simple, yet the structure and layers make it sound almost unreal. Stripping the instrument parts away from the whole gives an insight to the importance of each individual instrument.

I dream about this piece at night.

I am beginning to worry about ruining the soul of the piece. Like some DJs who write a “Classical” (this term is taken very loosely at times) work and run away with a hit, I also play around with the limits of an instrument. At first I did not like the idea of DJing up a Classic, then I realised I sometimes have change the range of an instrument due to the fact the original instrument is not one of the chosen few.

So, what the hey!!!

Though I am a desk jockey by trade, musicating helps settle the mind. I have taken an interest in furthering my knowledge of Ravel, and beginning with one of his best-known works is a good place to start. A pianist by training, Ravel was able to mix the Baroque with the ancient Greek. Today we see these mixtures (in some cases) as ho-hum, Ravel made it revolutionary.

Our DJ friends do similar things when they wiggle their electronic knobbly bits. I think I need to give these people respect, not some but a lot.