Well, my classmates, it is coming along nicely. The Boléro, that is.

I do not want to offend my DJ master mixer friends, but this piece is one of the best examples of repetitive beats you will ever find – bar none. The instrumentation, as a whole, is very simple, yet the structure and layers make it sound almost unreal. Stripping the instrument parts away from the whole gives an insight to the importance of each individual instrument.

I dream about this piece at night.

I am beginning to worry about ruining the soul of the piece. Like some DJs who write a “Classical” (this term is taken very loosely at times) work and run away with a hit, I also play around with the limits of an instrument. At first I did not like the idea of DJing up a Classic, then I realised I sometimes have change the range of an instrument due to the fact the original instrument is not one of the chosen few.

So, what the hey!!!

Though I am a desk jockey by trade, musicating helps settle the mind. I have taken an interest in furthering my knowledge of Ravel, and beginning with one of his best-known works is a good place to start. A pianist by training, Ravel was able to mix the Baroque with the ancient Greek. Today we see these mixtures (in some cases) as ho-hum, Ravel made it revolutionary.

Our DJ friends do similar things when they wiggle their electronic knobbly bits. I think I need to give these people respect, not some but a lot.